A Comprensive Glycemic Index Chart along with a Low Glycemic Food List

 

The Glycemic Index Chart is a very handy tool to use if you’re trying to watch what you eat, and you’ll find that using it will make it much easier in your everyday life to keep your blood sugar under control. With so many people around the world suffering from diabetes, low glycemic index diets have become much more important.


Understanding the glycemic index of common food will help you to make the best low glycemic index meal plan.

The food you eat should come primarily from the low glycemic food lists, as that will ensure that you reduce your fast carb consumption. By cutting fast carbs, you’ll keep your blood sugar levels normal.


A Low Glycemic Food List

Milk – Why not Try Low Carb Soy Milk

Milk is usually fairly high on the GI, as it contains a good deal of sugar in the form of lactose.

However, taking the sugar out of milk isn’t really possible, and trying to will just increase the fat in the sugar.

It’s a tough balance to achieve between fat and sugar, but the good news is that there are low fat and low carb milks that you can try.

For example, 2% milk is fairly low in fat, and there is a brand of milk called Carb Countdown 2% milk that is low in carbs as well.

However, if you want to find milk that’s low in fat and carbs, you should try soy milk.

Soy beans are very low in the GI, and they contain very little fat. You’ll find that most soy products are very good for your diet, and they’ll be ideal if you want to keep your carb and fat consumption limited.

Soy milk may taste a bit strange, but it will be excellent for your low carb diet. You’ll avoid all the lactose and fat naturally found in dairy, and it will give you all the calcium you need for a healthy body.


Barley – A Rich Natural Fiber Source

Barley is an excellent source of fiber, and it’s fairly low in the glycemic index if it’s found in the right form.

Pearled barley is the grain that contains the fewest carbs, which means that it’s excellent for a low carb diet.

It will be very rich in fiber – which cancels out most of the carbs – and you’ll find that it will be an ideal source of nutrients. If you want to eat grains while on a low glycemic diet, barley will be the grain to go for.

If you can find barley that has been de-hulled, it will make a wonderful replacement for oats in your breakfast meal.

Barley will taste a bit stronger than oats, but the addition of natural sugars from fruits and raisins can help to make it tasty.

You’ll find that it can be a good grain to enrich your soups and stews, and it will be a tasty snack to help give you lots of energy for your workouts – just like oats.

Thanks to its high fiber and low carb content, barley will be a much better choice for your low glycemic index diet.


Bread – More Whole Grains Lowers the GI

Most people think of bread as being fairly high in carbs, and white bread is one of the few foods ranked near 100 on the GI.

White bread is one of the worst things that you can eat while on a low glycemic diet, and even brown bread will have a stronger effect on your glucose than you might like.

However, the good news is that not all bread will be bad for you to eat. If you use the grain in its natural form and grind it into flour yourself, it will be much easier on your body.

Many people turn to lower GI grains for their bread, which is why oat, barley, and corn breads are so popular among those on a low GI diet.

Many people eat bread using soy, which is one of the lowest GI foods around.

Corn tortillas are a good replacement for bread, as they have a much lower GI ranking than bread.

They may not be as rich in fiber as some of the other foods on the GI, but they’re not too high in carbs. They can be a good alternative if you want to eat starch without overdoing it on the carbs.

Sprouted grains will actually be an excellent option if you’re trying to keep your glucose levels low.

They tend to have a much larger kernel than grains like wheat, which means that they’ll take longer for your body to digest.

Sprouted millet, barley, and soy beans will make excellent bread, and it will be much lower on the Glycemic Index than regular breads.

The addition of fiber to breads can also help to reduce carbs, as it lowers the Glycemic Load of the foods.

Look for breads that are rich in fiber, as they’re the ones to eat while on the low carb diet.


Pasta – Don’t Fear, Low GI Pasta Does Exist

There are many types of pasta noodles, but almost all of the noodles you’re accustomed to eating will be too high in carbs for you to enjoy while on the low carb diet.

They are made using white flour, and they’ve been refined to the point that they’ll be the first thing processed by your body and turned into glucose which will raise your blood sugar.

Those trying to reduce their blood sugar levels will have to cut back on the noodles, as they’re just going to have too much of an effect to be included in the diet.

However, the good news is that there are noodles that you can eat while on the low carb diet.

Companies like Dreamfields make noodles with special grains that are lower on the GI than wheat, and they won’t affect your blood sugar levels as much.

These noodles will be lower in carbs than egg noodles, so they’ll come in handy if you just can’t stand a diet that doesn’t include pasta of some sort. They make all kinds of noodles, including spaghetti, macaroni, lasagna, and more, and they’ll be a good choice if you just have to have some noodles.

Another form of noodles that will be ideal for your low carb diet are Shirataki noodles.

These noodles are made from a Japanese root called Konyaku, one of the starchiest vegetables on the planet.

The root is actually surprisingly low on the Glycemic Index, and the noodles will be excellent for you to eat while on the low carb diet. They are a bit rubbery, but they have a very nice Oriental taste that makes them a great choice for your soups and Asian meals.

They’re not going to replace pasta for marinara or Bolognese sauce, but they will be a form of noodles that you can eat while on the low carb diet.


The Glycemic Index Chart

Here is a glycemic index chart infographic with the glycemic index values for many different types of food.

  • Red background means a high glycemic index, above 70.
  • Orange background means a medium glycemic index, between 56-69.
  • Green background means a low glycemic index, below 55.

A glycemic index chart with high and low glycemic foods


Delicious Low GI Breakfast Ideas

Want a tasty breakfast?

Try this simple combination below:


Sausage – A Good Protein Source

Sausage is rich in protein and fat, but it contains almost no carbs.

Most protein rich foods are low in carbs, as there is almost no sugar or starch in the protein.

Make sure that it’s real sausage meat and not the processed hot dog versions that are sold in the supermarket.


Bacon and Eggs – A Surprising Power Booster

This is a very hearty combination that will get your fat burning all day long.

The fat in the bacon will actually jump start your metabolism, and the egg protein will be the lean protein that you need to keep your muscles working for hours.

If you eat one whole egg and two egg whites, it will be a protein-rich meal that will keep you going.

Going for turkey bacon instead of regular bacon will help to limit the cholesterol.


Healthy Drink – A Soy Milk Smoothie

There are many low carb breakfast drinks sold by companies like Diabetic Meal Rx, and they can be a good way to start the day off right.

They’ll usually be made using soy milk, and they’ll have added ingredients that will make the drink tasty without being too high in carbs.

Adding some dietary fiber to the drink and dropping in some fruits can help to make a morning smoothie with all the right ingredients.


Cereal – Your Body Will Love Steel-Cut Oats

Oats tend to be fairly limited in their carb content, so you’ll find that eating a bit of steel-cut oats for breakfast can be the way to go.

Steel-cut oats contain more of the hull and fiber than rolled oats, which means they’ll be a bit harder to enjoy but they’ll be easier on your body.

Barley will make an excellent breakfast cereal, though you’ll have to try a bit harder to make it tasty.

With this meal, you’re ready for an active day ahead!


Low Carb Lunch Ideas

Want to make yourself a lunch that’s power-packed with nutrients but low in carbs?

Check out the ideas below:


Winter Veggies in Tasty Peanut Sauce

Peanuts make a delicious sauce to drizzle over your steamed winter veggies, most of which will be fairly low in calories.

  • Simply heat crushed peanuts in a pan with some soy sauce and rice vinegar, as well as the spices of your choice.
  • Cook your favorite winter veggies, and use the sauce to add some delicious flavor to your meal!

Tuna and Salmon

The best low carb foods are the ones that are rich in protein, and both tuna and salmon are loaded with protein.

They also contain healthy Omega 3 fatty acids, so they’ll be perfect for your low carb diet.

Adding a can of tuna or a salmon fillet to your daily meal plan will ensure that you are getting the right amount of protein, all without adding carbs to your diet.

The fat and protein will keep your body burning energy, and you’ll find that you’ll be able to do a lot more work and exercise thanks to your lunch.


Palm Hearts

Palm hearts make an excellent addition to your lunch, and they’ll replace the potatoes that you can’t eat while on the low carb diet.

They taste a bit nutty, but they’ll be a wonderful addition to any salad or soup you make.

You can serve them cold or hot, and they’ll give you lots of nutrients without adding too many carbs to your diet.


Healthy Snack Ideas

Need a snack to keep you going through the morning or afternoon? Here are some low carb snack ideas you can try:


Hummus

Hummus makes an ideal snack thanks to the fact that it’s very rich in fiber and protein.

Garbanzos do have some carbs, but they’re not as high as some legumes. You can make low carb hummus using chana dal, an Indian lentil that makes hummus every bit as delicious as regular hummus.

You can add any flavorings you want, and it will be a delicious meal that you can’t help but enjoy!


Radishes

Few people think of radishes as being a handy snack, but it can really be a tasty treat if made right.

Squeeze a bit of lemon over your radishes, and add salt and some chili powder for a spicy snack.

Japanese Daikon will be absolutely delicious, both in its pickled and raw forms. Enjoy these healthy treats for a low carb snack.


Cheese

Cheese makes a great snack for your low carb diet, especially the full-fat cheese.

Cheese doesn’t have as much sugar as milk, but it’s a bit higher in fat.

You will find that even sweet cheese can be fairly low in carbs, and the soft cheeses make a tasty snack.

Dip some celery sticks into Camembert or cream cheese, and you have a snack fit for the gods.


Nuts

Nuts make some of the best snacks, as they’re loaded with fats and fiber.

They do have some carbs in them, but they’re lower in carbs than you might expect. If you want a healthy snack that will keep you going for hours, go grab a handful of nuts and chow down.

These low carb food ideas will help you to snack on the right foods, and they’ll ensure that you follow a balanced, healthy diet!

Other Pages on This Site, You Might Want to Visit

Guide to a Low Glycemic Diet: Identifying Foods Low in the Glycemic Index & Ruling out the Sugary High GI Traitors

Find the Values of Different Low Glycemic Index Foods and Learn How to Healthily Follow a Low Carb Diet

A Low Glycemic Food List: Identifying the Good Slow Carbs and the Bad Fast Carbs

Glycemic Index Diet Guidelines: Low Glycemic Recipes and Foods

Exercise Glycemic Control by Following the Low Glycemic Index Diet

A Long Glycemic Index Food List to Keep Your Blood Sugar Levels Balanced

Low Glycemic Index Diet Tips: Simple Guidelines to Avoid the Trickery Pitfalls

Glycemic Index Food Chart Model: Showing You Carbohydrates High and Low in GI

The Healthy Low Glycemic Foods Diet: How to Eat According to the Glycemic Index

Go to the top of this page about the glycemic index chart

Disclaimer for LowGlycemic-Foods.com